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National forests cover 15% of Arizona, mostly mountains or plateaus over 6,000 feet but also large areas of desert between Phoenix and Flagstaff. Besides the varied scenic landscapes within the forests, they provide many locations for free camping when exploring Arizona's national and state parks, many of which are completely surrounded by these public lands.

National forests cover 15% of Arizona, mostly mountains or plateaus over 6,000 feet but also large areas of desert between Phoenix and Flagstaff. Besides the varied scenic landscapes within the forests, they provide many locations for free camping when exploring Arizona's national and state parks, many of which are completely surrounded by these public lands.

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Picture of Arizona - Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest
Arizona - Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest
The Apache and Sitgreaves National Forests, administrated as one National Forest, encompass two million acres of magnificent mountain country in east-central Arizona. The Sitgreaves was named for Captain Lorenzo Sitgreaves, a government topographical engineer who conducted the first scientific expedition across Arizona in the early 1850s. On the Sitgreaves, the major attractions for visitors are the Mogollon Rim and eight coldwater lakes. From the Mogollon Rim's 7,600-foot elevation, vista points provide inspiring views of the lowlands to the south. The Mogollon Rim, names after Don Jaun Ignacio Flores Mogollon (pronounced: muggy-own) who was the governor of the Province of New Mexico from 1712 to 1715, extends 200 miles from Flagstaff, Arizona, into western New Mexico.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coconino National Forest
Arizona - Coconino National Forest
The Coconino National Forest covers 1.8 million acres varying from enchanting semi-arid desert, magnificent ponderosa pine forests, to incredible views from alpine tundra. Elevations range from 2,600 feet in canyon bottoms to 12,643 feet at the top of the San Francisco Mountain. Opportunities on the forest are varied as the landscape. Whatever your taste for recreation or natural beauty, there's something here for you. There are scenic views of red rock canyons, stands of old-growth pine, streams, lakes, golden aspen in the autumn, deer, turkey and elk to hunt or photograph, and snow covered slopes to ski in the winter. Whether horseback riding, hiking, bicycling, driving, or skiing, you'll enjoy visiting the Coconino National Forest.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coronado National Forest- Douglas Ranger District
Arizona - Coronado National Forest- Douglas Ranger District
Dragoons, Chiricahuas, Cochise, Tombstone. . . .names that hark back to the Old West. All are associated with the lands that now make up the Coronado National Forest. The Coronado totals almost 2 milliion acres in 12 units, mountain ranges that rise like islands from a sea of desert sand. This map presents three of those units, the Dragoon, Chiricahua, and Peloncillo ranges which lie in the southeastern corner of Arizona.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Safford & Santa Catalina Ranger District
Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Safford & Santa Catalina Ranger District
The 1.7 million-acre Coronado consists of 15 mountain ranges which rise dramatically from a sea of surrounding desert. These are sometimes referred to as "Sky Islands." Elevations frange from 3,000 feet to 10,720 feet above sea level, supporting vegetation communities as biologically diverse as those encountered from Mexico to Canada. Views from these mountains are spectacular and visitors might experience all four seasons during a single day in the Coronado, spending the morning wandering among giant saguaros and the colorful cottonwood trees and playing in the snow later in the afternoon.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Sierra Vista & Nogales Ranger District
Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Sierra Vista & Nogales Ranger District
The 1.7 million-acre Coronado National Forest consists of 15 mountain ranges which rise dramatically from a sea of surrounding desert. These are sometimes referred to as "sky islands." Elevations range from 3,000 feet to 10,720 above sea level, supporting vegetation communities as biologically diverse as those encountered from Mexico to Canada. Views from these mountains are spectacular and visitors might experience all four seasons during a single day on the Coronado, spending the morning wandering among the giant saguaros and the colorful cottonwood trees and playing in the snow later in the afternoon.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Kaibab National Forest - North Kaibab Ranger District
Arizona - Kaibab National Forest - North Kaibab Ranger District
The Kaibab National Forest is part of the largest contiguous ponderosa pine forest in the United States. Bordering both the north and south rims of the Grand Canyon, the 1.6 million acres of the Kaibab has the distinction of being divided by one of Nature's greatest attractions. Headquartered in Williams, Arizona, the South Kaibab covers 1,422 square miles and the North Kaibab stretches over 1,010 square miles. Elevations vary on the forest from 5,500 feet in the southwest corner to 10,418 feet at the summit of Kendrick Peak on the Williams Ranger District. All the way from north-central Arizona into Utah, you'll find enough breathtaking views, outstanding forest scenery, unusual geologic formations, and just plain fun to keep you satisfied for days!
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Kaibab National Forest - Williams & Tusayan Ranger District
Arizona - Kaibab National Forest - Williams & Tusayan Ranger District
The Kaibab National Forest is part of the largest contiguous ponderosa pine forest in the United States. Bordering both the north and south rims of the Grand Canyon, the 1.6 million acres of the Kaibab has the distinction of being divided by one of Nature's greatest attractions. Headquartered in Williams, Arizona, the South Kaibab covers 1,422 square miles and the North Kaibab stretches over 1,010 square miles Elevations vary on the forest from 5,500 feet in the southwest corner to 10,418 feet at the summit of Kendrick Peak on the Williams Ranger District. All the way from north-central Arizona into Utah, you'll find enough breathtaking views, outstanding forest scenery, unusual geologic formations, and just plain fun to keep you satisfied for days!
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Prescott National Forest Map
Arizona - Prescott National Forest Map
Grief Hill, Yellowjacket Gulch, Lonesome Pocket, Blind Indian Creek, Battle Flat, and Horsethief Basin. These formidable place names of the Prescott National Forest are a heritage from harsher times. Within the Prescott National Forest there are nearly a million and a quarter acres just brimming with outdoor recreation opportunities. Their diversity is outstanding. High cool peaks of the Bradshaw Mountains contrast sharply with the sun-baked Sonoran Desert below. In between, desert grasslands, chaparral, canyon hardwoods, pinon and juniper woodlands, and vast ponderosa pine forests offer outstanding variety for Prescott National Forest visitors.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Prescott National Forest Atlas
Arizona - Prescott National Forest Atlas
National Forest Atlases are full color atlases, containing 8.5 x 11 inch topographic quadrangle maps at 1 inch to the mile scale. The Prescott National Forest lies in a mountainous section of central Arizona between forested plateaus to the north and arid desert to the south. Its 1.2 million acres range from 3,000 to 8,000 feet.
$40.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Tonto National Forest
Arizona - Tonto National Forest
Tonto is the largest and most varied of the six national forests in Arizona, with terrain ranging from the cactus-covered Sonoran Desert around Phoenix, elevation 1,400 feet, to pine clad mountains along the Mogollon Rim, up to 7,400 feet. Highways 87, 188 and 260 are the main routes across the region, though most is rough and accessed only by 4WD tracks. The forest also includes rocky canyons, grassy plains, rivers and several artificial lakes including Bartlett Reservoir and Theodore Roosevelt Lake.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Apache National Forest - Blue Range Wilderness
Arizona - Apache National Forest - Blue Range Wilderness
The Blue Range Primitive Area in the state of Arizona and the Blue Range Wilderness in the state of New Mexico together comprise 222,500 acres of pristine wilderness. Both areas are commonly referred to as the "Blue". Elevations range from 5,000 feet with a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem to mixed conifers at 9,000 feet. In between you will find vast expanses of pinyon and juniper woodlands. Located on the Apache National Forest.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Prescott National Forest - Granite Mountain Wilderness
Arizona - Prescott National Forest - Granite Mountain Wilderness
A rugged mosaic of chaparral, oak, and pine woodland and granite boulders, the 9,700-acre Granite Mountains Wilderness shelters a relatively unchanged remnant of Arizona's natural heritage. The mountain's home to ravens and red-tailed hawks, blacktail rattlesnakes, and collared lizards, jackrabbits and woodrats, mule deer, mountain lions and a community of hundreds of other rare and common plants and animals. As a wilderness, the mountain is theirs, and we're their guests when we visit here.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Prescott National Forest - Juniper Mesa & Apache Creek Wilderness
Arizona - Prescott National Forest - Juniper Mesa & Apache Creek Wilderness
Juniper Mesa Wilderness is situated in the Juniper Mountains of central Arizona in Yavapai County. It was designated as wilderness in 1984 through the Arizona Wilderness Act. Topographically, the mesa consists of an east-west escarpment breaking into steep canyons and rolling hills to the north and dropping abruptly to the south. Elevations range from 5,560 to 7,050 feet. Sedimentary and intrusive rocks typify the geology of the wilderness. Apache Creek Wilderness lies at the northern end of the Santa Maria Mountains of central Arizona in Yavapai County. The wilderness is 32 - 36 miles northwest of Prescott, Arizona; encompasses about 5,628 acres; and was designated wilderness in 1984 through the Arizona Wilderness Act. Elevation is the wilderness ranges from a low of 5,280 feet to a high of 6,973 feet. Granite knob is the primary landmark within the wilderness.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Tonto National Forest - Mazatal Wilderness
Arizona - Tonto National Forest - Mazatal Wilderness
The Mazatzal Wilderness contains over 252,500 acres of the Tonto and Coconino national forests. Established in 1940 and expanded to its present size in 1984, its name is from an old Indian culture in Mexico, and is correctly pronounced "Mah-zaht-zahl," meaning "land of the deer." The eastern side of this wilderness predominantly consists of brush or pine-covered mountains, sometimes broken by narrow, vertical-walled canyons. On its west side below the steep brush-covered foothills, the Verde River flows through the Sonoran Desert. This river was designated by the U.S Congress as Arizona's only Wild River Area in 1984.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Apache National Forest - Mount Baldy Wilderness
Arizona - Apache National Forest - Mount Baldy Wilderness
Mount Baldy Wilderness was designated as part of the National Wilderness Preservation System in 1970. Its 7,079 acres on the eastern slope of Mount Baldy lie entirely within Springerville Ranger District of the Apache National Forest. Elevations vary from 9,000 to 11,400 feet above sea level. Mount Baldy is an extinct volcano that has experienced 3 distinct periods of glaciation. Baldy Peak itself is on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation and is not included in the Wilderness Area.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Mount Wrightson and Parjarita Wildernesses
Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Mount Wrightson and Parjarita Wildernesses
Mt. Wrightson Wilderness encompasses 25,260 acres. Rising a magnificent 7,000 feet from the desert floor, 9,453-foot high Mount Wrightson is visible from great distances. At the core the Santa Rita Mountains, this Wilderness has rough hillsides, deep canyons and lofty ridges and peaks surrounded on all sides by semiarid hills and sloping grasslands. Pajarita Wilderness encompasses 7,553 acres. Pajarita is a Spanish word meaning, "little bird."The area's rugged canyons, which point south toward the subtropical environments of Mexico and Central America, provide a natural migration route for a surprising diversity of birds.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coronado National Forest - North Chiricahua Mountain Wilderness
Arizona - Coronado National Forest - North Chiricahua Mountain Wilderness
While not the highest mountains in southeast Arizona, the Chiricahua Mountains are the most massive. Explosive volcanism and continental uplifting 50 to 75 million years ago formed the mountains of this region. Further periods of volcanic activity and long-term erosion shaped the Chiricahuas into what they are today. Volcanic outflows combined with ash and dust to form "welded tuff". Time has weathered this material into unique pinnacles, balanced rocks, and caves now found in these mountains.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Pusch Wilderness
Arizona - Coronado National Forest - Pusch Wilderness
Pusch Ridge towers over Tucson and the surrounding desert as one of the most prominent features of the Santa Catalina Mountains. With its lower slopes dotted with cactus and its upper reaches dark with pines, this unmistakable landmark makes the point in no uncertain terms that this is a land of extremes in biodiversity as well as topography. Within the 56,933-acre Wilderness, elevations range from 2,800 to 8,800 feet. Deep canyons separated by razorback ridges crease the slopes; rocky bluffs and pinnacles define the horizon. From the floor of Sabino Canyon to the upper slopes of Mt. Lemmon, life zones vary from Sonoran desert to subalpine forest. The wildlife community that inhabits such a varied setting is diverse as well. Black bears and coatimundis, Stellers jays and cactus wrens, saguaro cactus and Douglas-fir can all be found here as components of a natural diversity that has few rivals.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Tonto National Forest - Superstition Wilderness
Arizona - Tonto National Forest - Superstition Wilderness
Stark and rugged beauty, combined with a well-developed trail system, make Superstition Wilderness the most popular wilderness in the United States. The Forest Service is dedicated to protecting and managing Superstition Wilderness and preserving the natural conditions and "outstanding opportunities of solitude or a primitive, unconfined type of recreation." (Wilderness Act of 1964).
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of Arizona - Coconino National Forest - Sycamore Canyon Wilderness
Arizona - Coconino National Forest - Sycamore Canyon Wilderness
The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Trail System within the Peaks Ranger District consists of 5 trails with a combined mileage of 11.3 miles with the longest trail being 5.6 miles. These trails include: Kelsey Springs Trail, Dorsey Trail, Winter Cabin Trail, Little Lo Trail, and Hog Hill Trail. Each trail is suitable for day hikes or longer overnight loop hikes. Sycamore Canyon can be very hot and dry during the summer months. There are several springs located near the Wilderness trails which normally have water year round but hikers should not depend on this water being available and all ground water should always be treated or filtered. There is plenty of shade along all of the trails as you descend into Sycamore Canyon through a thick forest of Ponderosa Pine, Gambel Oak, and Juniper trees. The lower part of Winter Cabin Trail and part of Kelsey Springs Trail takes you through chaparral type vegetation which offers spectacular views of Sycamore Canyon. Sycamore Canyon is the second largest canyon is Arizona and offers hikers plenty of solitude and natural beauty.
$20.00 excl tax