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Mt. McKinley: The Pioneer Climbs

By Terris Moore
$16.95 excl tax

From the back cover:

The natives called it Denali, "the great one," and accorded the nagnificenbt mountain their respect. Sourdoughs, adventurers and mountaineers knew it as Alaska's Mt. McKinley, highest point on the North American continent and a supreme challenge. Measured from base to summit, McKinley involves more climbing than Mt. Everest.

In this book, Terris Moore presents a dramatic account of man's contest with McKinley, from initial explorations on into the 1940's. With documented facts and a novelist's skills, he tackles the mysteries and controversies surrounding many of the early expeditions. There was the daring 1910 ascent of the North Peak by a group of lasska soudoughs, who carried up a large pole to plant on the top only to discover later that there was another, higher summit. There was the heartbreaking effort in 1912 by Belmore Browne, who was forced to turn around less than 150 vertical feet from the summit, leaving the top for Archdeacon Hudson Struck to achieve in 1913. Perhaps the most widely discussed attempt was that of Arctic explorer Dr. Fredrick Cook, who tried to support his claim of victory in 1906 with faked photos.

Moore is particularly qualified to write this account, for he himself participated in McKinley's third ascent. He is a Mainer professionally based in Cambridge, Mass., but Alaska became his second home following his presidency of the University of Alaska, 1949-53. His mountaineering began early, while at Williams, and at Harvard where he earned his doctorate. His first ascents include the Sangay Volcano in Ecuador; Mts. Fairweather, Bona, and Sanford in Alaska. At age 24, Moore was rope leader of the climbing team which made the first ascent of Minya Konka, the 24,900' peak astride the China-Tibet border, for 25 years thereafter the highest summit to be reached by Americans. The story of this climb is told in Men Against the Clouds, of which Moore was a contributing author.

Later, mountain flying became his other love equal to mountaineering. In 1951 he pioneered the first landings on McKinley's Kahitna Glacier, and three times thereafter in Alaska set new altitude records for mountain landings.

From the back cover:

The natives called it Denali, "the great one," and accorded the nagnificenbt mountain their respect. Sourdoughs, adventurers and mountaineers knew it as Alaska's Mt. McKinley, highest point on the North American continent and a supreme challenge. Measured from base to summit, McKinley involves more climbing than Mt. Everest.

In this book, Terris Moore presents a dramatic account of man's contest with McKinley, from initial explorations on into the 1940's. With documented facts and a novelist's skills, he tackles the mysteries and controversies surrounding many of the early expeditions. There was the daring 1910 ascent of the North Peak by a group of lasska soudoughs, who carried up a large pole to plant on the top only to discover later that there was another, higher summit. There was the heartbreaking effort in 1912 by Belmore Browne, who was forced to turn around less than 150 vertical feet from the summit, leaving the top for Archdeacon Hudson Struck to achieve in 1913. Perhaps the most widely discussed attempt was that of Arctic explorer Dr. Fredrick Cook, who tried to support his claim of victory in 1906 with faked photos.

Moore is particularly qualified to write this account, for he himself participated in McKinley's third ascent. He is a Mainer professionally based in Cambridge, Mass., but Alaska became his second home following his presidency of the University of Alaska, 1949-53. His mountaineering began early, while at Williams, and at Harvard where he earned his doctorate. His first ascents include the Sangay Volcano in Ecuador; Mts. Fairweather, Bona, and Sanford in Alaska. At age 24, Moore was rope leader of the climbing team which made the first ascent of Minya Konka, the 24,900' peak astride the China-Tibet border, for 25 years thereafter the highest summit to be reached by Americans. The story of this climb is told in Men Against the Clouds, of which Moore was a contributing author.

Later, mountain flying became his other love equal to mountaineering. In 1951 he pioneered the first landings on McKinley's Kahitna Glacier, and three times thereafter in Alaska set new altitude records for mountain landings.

Products specifications
Edition 2000
Format Paperback
Binding Glue / Perfect
Pages 203
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Products specifications
Edition 2000
Format Paperback
Binding Glue / Perfect
Pages 203
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