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The five national forests in New Mexico cover most of the state's mountainous areas, plus a few isolated sections of the eastern prairies. There is also one national grassland (Kiowa), which is managed jointly with the Cibola National Forest, plus small parts of two national forests whose major area is in Arizona (Apache-Sitgreaves and Coronado).

The five national forests in New Mexico cover most of the state's mountainous areas, plus a few isolated sections of the eastern prairies. There is also one national grassland (Kiowa), which is managed jointly with the Cibola National Forest, plus small parts of two national forests whose major area is in Arizona (Apache-Sitgreaves and Coronado).

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Picture of New Mexico - Carson National Forest
New Mexico - Carson National Forest
The Carson National Forest is one of five National Forests in New Mexico. The National Forests are America's Great outdoors, here to serve the American people at work and play! Some of the finest mountain scenery in the Southwest is found in the 1.5 million acres covered by the Carson National Forest. Elevations rise from 6,000 feet to 13,161 feet at Wheeler Peak, the highest in New Mexico. Our objective is to maintain that natural beauty.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Carson National Forest - Valle Vidal Unit
New Mexico - Carson National Forest - Valle Vidal Unit
The Carson National Forest has a 100,000-acre tract of land called Valle Vidal Unit. Donated to the people of the United States by the Penzoil Company of Houston, Texas in 1982, the Unit retains much of its original features. Valle Vidal is managed as a wildlife habitat where disperse camping permitted. (Dispersed is undeveloped camping and not included in this campground review. Contact the Carson National Forest for more information about this type of camping.) It is not quite a wilderness but does have seriously limited vehicle use. Cimarron and McCrystal are the only two developed campgrounds in the Unit. At either location, campers have the luxuries of a Forest Service developed campground while enjoying the vastness and openness of the Unit. However, the entire Unit is open to dispersed camping for those who want to experience how the West really was not to long ago. One of the more unique features of the Valle Vidal Unit is its lack of maintained trails. The Forest seems to encourage visitors to park their vehicle (in a designated parking area), and packing water, a compass, map, and whatever else might be needed, head out to explore the pristine Unit. The crystal clear rivers, rolling grass covered hills, and towering tree covered mountains will keep hiker or horseback rider entertained for many, many hours.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Magdalena Ranger District
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Magdalena Ranger District
At nearly 900,000 acres the Magdalena Ranger District is the largest of four mountain Districts and four grasslands administered by the Cibola National Forest. The District itself is composed of four separate and distinct mountain ranges in southwest New Mexico covering the three counties of Socorro, Catron, and Sierra. The ranges include the Datils, Bears, San Mateos and Magdalena Mountains. From the peak of South Baldy at 10,700 dropping in elevation to under 6000 feet in the southern portion of the San Mateos, varied topography and ecosystems can be found on the district.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Mount Taylor Ranger District
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Mount Taylor Ranger District
The Mt. Taylor Ranger District is comprised of two mountain ranges, Mt. Taylor and the Zuni Mountains, totaling nearly 520,000 acres of National Forest land. Elevations range from 6,500 to 11,301 feet. Mt. Taylor is an area of special religious and cultural significance to several Native American communities. Mt. Taylor and the Zuni Mountains are rich in cultural resources including many historic sawmills and logging community sites and logging railroad beds. The Mt. Taylor Ranger District office is located in Grants. The Grants area, like much of New Mexico is rich in history.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Mountainair Ranger District
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Mountainair Ranger District
The Mountainair Ranger District is made up of the Gallinas and Manzano mountains. It takes approximately one to two and one-half hours from Albuquerque and 30 minutes to one and one-half hours from Belen and Los Lunas. The closest unit to us is the Manzano Mountains located in the midst of the fastest growing region in the State of New Mexico, Bernalillo, Valencia and Torrance County. Torrance County grew by 42.9 percent in the last nine years. Albuquerque residents and surrounding municipalities and tourists have found the scenery and beauty of the Manzano Mountains.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Sandia Ranger District
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Sandia Ranger District
Just east of Albuquerque are the most visited mountains in New Mexico. Millions of people journey into the Sandia Mountains each year. More than half these visitors ride the Sandia Peak Tram or drive the Sandia Crest National Scenic Byway to take in spectacular panoramic views of Central New Mexico and to enjoy many other recreational opportunities. The Four Seasons Visitor Center offers year round interpretive exhibits and seasonal programs at the upper Tram Building. The Scenic Byway has several newly remodeled picnic grounds with shelters and group areas for reservation.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Gila National Forest
New Mexico - Gila National Forest
The Gila National Forest is public land, managed in trust for all citizens; its management requires different laws and regulations based on local conditions. It is your responsibility to become familiar with conditions and restrictions by checking with local offices and reading signs and bulletin boards. It is your responsibility to be aware of potential risks and take safety precautions at all times when you visit any national forest.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - Guadalupe Ranger District
New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - Guadalupe Ranger District
Located in South Central New Mexico, the Lincoln National Forest is known as the birthplace of the world-famous Smokey Bear, the living symbol of the campaign to prevent forest fires. The original bear is buried in Capitan, New Mexico. The Lincoln consists of three ranger districts; Sacramento, Smokey Bear and Guadalupe. There are three major mountain ranges; Sacramento, Guadalupe and Capitan that cover 1,103,441 acres in parts of four counties in southeastern New Mexico. Elevations of 4,000 to 11,500 feet pass through five different life zones from Chihuahuan desert to sub-alpine forest. Vegetation ranges from rare cacti in the lower elevations to Englemann spruce in the higher. Also includes the Carlsbad Caverns National Park & Guadalupe Mountains National Park.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - Smokey Bear & Sacramento Ranger District
New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - Smokey Bear & Sacramento Ranger District
Located in South Central New Mexico, the Lincoln National Forest is known as the birthplace of the world-famous Smokey Bear, the living symbol of the campaign to prevent forest fires. The original bear is buried in Capitan, New Mexico. The Lincoln consists of three ranger districts; Sacramento, Smokey Bear and Guadalupe. There are three major mountain ranges; Sacramento, Guadalupe and Capitan that cover 1,103,441 acres in parts of four counties in southeastern New Mexico. Elevations of 4,000 to 11,500 feet pass through five different life zones from Chihuahuan desert to sub-alpine forest. Vegetation ranges from rare cacti in the lower elevations to Englemann spruce in the higher.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest Atlas
New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest Atlas
This atlas provides coverage for every 7.5-minute quad intersecting the Lincoln National Forest, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, and Guadalupe Mountains National Park boundaries, as well as any adjacent quads which may be necessary to convey important access information. Lincoln National Forest lies in southeastern New Mexico and consists of 3 ranger districts: Sacramento, Smokey Bear and Guadalupe. The forest covers the Sacramento, Guadalupe, and Capitan mountain ranges. Elevations range from 4,000 to 11,500 feet, passing through five different life zones from Chihuahuan desert to sub-alpine forest. Spring is the windy season and these high winds dry the forest to the point of extreme fire danger. Fire season usually starts in March or April and continues through mid-July. The rainy season begins in July and continues through September. The first snows fall in late October or early November.
$48.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Santa Fe National Forest
New Mexico - Santa Fe National Forest
Sante Fe National Forest encompasses 1,567,181 acres in two units. East of the Rio Grande, the southern Sangre de Cristo (Blood of Christ) Mountains dominate the Pecos-Las Vegas Ranger District. These mountains are crowned by the spectacular Pecos Wilderness, where 13,101 foot Truchas Peak shares winter snows with other lofty spires.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands
New Mexico - Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands
Kiowa National Grasslands covers 136,505 acres near Roy and Clayton, New Mexico. Rita Blanca National Grasslands includes 77,463 acres in Texas and 15,860 acres in Okalahoma.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Gila National Forest - Aldo Leopold Wilderness
New Mexico - Gila National Forest - Aldo Leopold Wilderness
Aldo Leopold Wilderness is named for the great conservation pioneer, Aldo Leopold. It is a rugged and wild country of deep canyons, long ridges and mesas, stream valleys and lofty peaks. There are many pinnacles and spires of volcanic origin along the major streams, and virgin stands of ponderosa pines. The canyons are often brushy, and water is scarce. The Aldo Leopold offers a true primitive wilderness adventure, and a place of incomparable beauty and solitude.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Apache Kid & Withington Wilderness
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Apache Kid & Withington Wilderness
Apache Kid Wilderness was created by the New Mexico Wilderness Act of 1980 and is administered by the Magdalena Ranger District of the Cibola National Forest. The wilderness contains 44,650 very rugged acres in the southern portion of the San Mateo Mountains. Elevations range from about 6,400 feet to over 10,000 feet at Blue Mountain, San Mateo Mountain, San Mateo Peak, and Vick's Peak. The topography of the area is very rugged , with sheer cliffs at Vick's Peak and steep-walled canyons throughout. Withington Wilderness is also administered by the Magdalena Ranger District of the Cibola National Forest. The wilderness contains 18,870 acres, generally located on the northeastern slopes of the San Mateo Mountains. The topography is quite rugged, with elevations varying from 6,800 to 10,100 feet.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - Capitan Mountains Wilderness
New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - Capitan Mountains Wilderness
Capitan Mountain Wilderness was placed in the National Wilderness Preservation System in 1980. It contains about 35,000 acres and lies entirely within the Smokey Bear Ranger District of the Lincoln National Forest. The wilderness is approximately 12 miles long and ranges in width from 2 to 6 miles. This small mountain range is unique in that it is one of the few ranges that run from the east to the west. The north sides of the Wilderness is comprised of steep rocky slopes with numerous canyons. The main ridge has a number of meadows. The south face of the range has many large rock outcrops. Capitan Peak, Chimney Rock and Sunset Peak are all located in this area. Elevation ranges from 6,500 feet on the east side to 10,083 feet at Capitan Peak. Summit Peak just outside the Wilderness is 10,179 feet. The lower stretches of this area are comprised of pinyon-juniper woodland. Mid-slopes are generally wooded with ponderosa pine and pinyon. The main ridge top has mixed conifers including Douglas fir, Engleman Spruce, Corkbark Fir, and Ponderosa Pine. There are also several good-sized Aspen groves.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Carson National Forest - Cruces Basin Wilderness
New Mexico - Carson National Forest - Cruces Basin Wilderness
The Cruces Basin Wilderness is located in northern New Mexico within the Tusas Mountains, a southern extension of the Rocky Mountains. The elevation within the wilderness ranges from 10,900 feet along the Brazos Ridge near the western boundary, to 8,500 feet near the Los Pinos River.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Gila National Forest - Gila Wilderness
New Mexico - Gila National Forest - Gila Wilderness
The Mogollon, Diablo, Tularosa, Mimbres, Pino Altos, and Black are all mountain ranges in southwestern New Mexico. These ranges make up the Gila National Forest. In the center of this vast area is located the canyon and mesa terrain, now known as the Gila Wilderness and the Aldo Leopold Wilderness. This land has been relatively untouched by man since the lat prehistoric Indians left, sometime during the late 1200s.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Manzano Wilderness
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Manzano Wilderness
Occupying mainly the west slope of the Manzano Mountain range, this wilderness ranges from pinion- juniper woodland at 5,000 feet to ponderosa pine and aspen at the 10,000-foot crest. Terrain is steep and rugged, cut with canyons and rock outcrops. A well-developed trail system is little used.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Santa Fe National Forest - Pecos Wilderness
New Mexico - Santa Fe National Forest - Pecos Wilderness
The Pecos Wilderness was established September 3, 1964. The New Mexico Wilderness Act of 1980 added 55,000 acres to the Pecos Wilderness, which now totals 223,667 acres and includes portions of the Pecos-Las Vegas and EspaƱola Ranger Districts of the Santa Fe National Forest, and the Camino Real Ranger District of the Carson National Forest.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Santa Fe National Forest - San Pedro Parks Wilderness
New Mexico - Santa Fe National Forest - San Pedro Parks Wilderness
The black grid lines shown on this map represent the UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) 1,000 meter grid system, Zone 13. The UTM grid is the military equivalent of latitude and longitude, only easier for most people to read because it is measured in meters rather that degrees, minutes and seconds. This grid can be used in conjunction with a GPS unit to easily locate yourself anywhere within the area shown on this map. Each solid line in the grid is spaced 1,000 meters from the one adjacent to it. A second grid is shown on this map. Solid red lines represent a 7 1/2 minute grid in standard latitude/longitude format. Additional red ticks indicate a 2 1/2 minute grid within that system. The area just west of San Pedro Parks Wilderness is restricted to non-motorized use only. The use of ATVs, off-road vehicles, chainsaws, etc is prohibited.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Sandia Mountain Wilderness
New Mexico - Cibola National Forest - Sandia Mountain Wilderness
The colorful Sandia Mountain Wilderness symbolizes the enchantment of New Mexico. Sandia means "watermelon" and the mountain gets its name from the delicate pink coloration during sunsets. The rapid rise in elevation from 6,500 feet in its foothills to 10,678 feet at the Sandia Crest observation site almost duplicates in climate, plants, and animals, the changes experienced by traveling from the southern United States to the Canadian border. As a result, this small but majestic mountain is a mirror of the North American Continent, reflecting a surprising diversity of life.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Carson National Forest - Wheeler Peak & Latir Peak Wilderness
New Mexico - Carson National Forest - Wheeler Peak & Latir Peak Wilderness
The Wheeler Peak Wilderness includes almost 20,000 acres. Lying along the top of the Sangre De Cristo mountain range Wheeler Peak Wilderness is characterized by high rugged terrain. Elevations range from a low of 7,650 feet to a high of 13,161 feet at Wheeler Peak, the highest point in the State of New Mexico.
$20.00 excl tax
Picture of New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - White Mountains Wilderness
New Mexico - Lincoln National Forest - White Mountains Wilderness
Located north and west of Ruidoso, New Mexico, in the Lincoln National Forest. Unlike many large wildernesses with their numerous mountain ranges, the White Mountain Wilderness is a long north/south oriented ridge and its adjoining canyon and ridges. In the southern portion of the wilderness, elevations rise to over 11,580 feet near Lookout Mountain and the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation. Going north, the elevation begins steadily dropping to barely 6,000 feet some 12 air miles away at the northern boundary near Diamond Peak. The west side of this ridge is steeper with more rugged terrain features including some extensive rock outcroppings. The east side is gentler with broader, forested canyons and a few small streams.
$20.00 excl tax